Abstract

Many innovations in Samuel Richardson's final novel, Sir Charles Grandison, set it apart. I argue that the ways in which Richardson innovated in the final volume in particular altered his attitude toward closure. Richardson carried this modified way of thinking into the work of his late life, as self-editor and anthologizer. Grandison is a vital key to understanding his didactic project as a whole—and is, in many ways, the conclusion of that project. Moreover, Richardson's moves are far from unique, and examining the form of Richardson's ending begins to show us a more comprehensive understanding of the history of the novel.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 651-667
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-19
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.