Abstract

Early modern European corpse pharmacology, the medical ingestion of human body parts and excretions, involves a gruesome process of bodily violations made possible by a brutal judicial system. This essay argues that the figurative language of medicine in Titus Andronicus, where human bodies are savagely deployed and eaten as powerful pollutants in an escalating therapeutics of revenge justice, interrogates the cultural paradox evident when cannibalism is considered as both barbaric and taboo, and civilized and beneficial, depending on the circumstances.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 677-708
Launched on MUSE
2003-10-22
Open Access
No
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