Abstract

Milton's "Epitaphium Damonis", like "Lycidas" before it, crafts a vision of ideal homosocial companionship whose basic terms reappear, mutatis mutandis, in the model of companionate marriage proposed by the later divorce tracts. In both cases, Milton contrasts human intimacy with the society of brute beasts, which he presents as simultaneously inferior to and yet proleptic of the human emotional bond. As a result, we may see the poet's thinking on marriage to be informed by notions of same-species and same-sex conjugality.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 787-811
Launched on MUSE
2003-10-22
Open Access
No
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