Abstract

In Philip Roth’s The Dying Animal (2001), desire is figured as the revenge of death for the aging libertine David Kepesh. Embodying the object of his desire as a work of art allows him to harmlessly enjoy the volupté of death. The mimesis of art, however, cannot offer protection against the eventual realities of living and dying. The recognition of mortality Consuela Castillo provokes in Kepesh is implicated in a formal stylistic process questioning the verisimilitude of representation and meditating on art’s mediation of experiences of death and desire.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-5278
Print ISSN
1547-3929
Pages
pp. 95-100
Launched on MUSE
2012-05-30
Open Access
No
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