Abstract

This article situates Hurston's largely neglected theatrical presentations of West Indian folk dance alongside the better-known dance work of Baker and Dunham in order to trace shifts in the racialized meanings surrounding black vernacular dance stagings in the early decades of the twentieth century. A comparative survey of the three artists exposes an important if complicated historical transition from stereotypical representations of black primitivity to more nuanced representations of a black diaspora.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-332X
Print ISSN
0192-2882
Pages
pp. 433-450
Launched on MUSE
2003-10-17
Open Access
No
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