Abstract

The article focuses on “Pan-Slavism” and “Pan-Orthodoxy” to analyze the continuity and change in the Russian relationship to the “Christian East” - mostly Greek and Slavic Christian Orthodox populations in the Ottoman Empire (1856–1914). Far from being conservative utopias, those theories were modern visions that developed in the context of fin-de-siecle Europe and transformed the traditional meaning of the Christian East in order to reformulate cultural identity in late imperial Russia. This kind of conceptualization of Pan-Slavism and Pan-Orthodoxy also contributes to the discussion of how and when alternatives to Western liberal modernity began to be formulated consciously.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3222
Print ISSN
0022-5037
Pages
pp. 295-317
Launched on MUSE
2012-05-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.