Abstract

This article discusses central themes in the poetry of three Hebrew poets who are children of Holocaust survivors. Rivka Miriam, Oded Peled, and Tania Hadar are second-generation poets who have given a unique and articulate expression to their perceptions of the Holocaust as event and memory. The focus of the discussion is the ways in which the poets assess the political and moral meaning of the State of Israel as a result and aftermath of the Holocaust. Most intriguing, however, is the way in which these poets fuse personal and political visions, creating both "particularistic" and "universalistic" representations of the Holocaust as a historical event and an ongoing reality.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5165
Print ISSN
0882-8539
Pages
pp. 64-76
Launched on MUSE
2012-10-03
Open Access
No
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