Abstract

Assia Djebar's 1985 Algerian novel L'Amour, la fantasia dramatizes the difficulty of finding a place for contemporary feminist Islamic discourse to begin, while her 1991 novel Loin de Médine confounds both Western reductions of Islam to "fanaticism" and Muslim alternatives of conventionalist or fundamentalist interpretation by depicting the Prophet's authority as indissociable from his ethical subjectivity: revelation emerges from responsiveness to the Other. Articulating by example an ethics concordant with feminism, the Prophet exemplifies a subjectivity inspired in its transcendence of naturalized ideologies and egocentricism, a subjectivity that L'Amour, la fantasia portrays as at once ethically necessary and emancipatory.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6598
Print ISSN
0026-7910
Pages
pp. 841-866
Launched on MUSE
2003-09-24
Open Access
No
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