Abstract

Using the National Education Longitudinal Study, this study explored various factors that predicted bachelor’s degree attainment among rural youth attending a four-year institution. Results showed that Hispanic origin, family income, parental educational expectations, the rigor of the high school curriculum, timing and intensity of college enrollment, and participation in Greek social clubs were significant predictors. Contrary to expectations, gender, parental education, family structure, number of siblings, institutional features of the college first attended, and participation in intramural athletics and student government were insignificant predictors. The discussion highlights implications for secondary and postsecondary policies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1090-7009
Print ISSN
0162-5748
Pages
pp. 463-484
Launched on MUSE
2012-03-10
Open Access
No
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