Abstract

The use of problem-solving strategies by 59 deaf and hard of hearing children, grades K–3, was investigated. The children were asked to solve 9 arithmetic story problems presented to them in American Sign Language. The researchers found that while the children used the same general types of strategies that are used by hearing children (i.e., modeling, counting, and fact-based strategies), they showed an overwhelming use of counting strategies for all types of problems and at all ages. This difference may have its roots in language or instruction (or in both), and calls attention to the need for conceptual rather than procedural mathematics instruction for deaf and hard of hearing students.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-0375
Print ISSN
0002-726X
Pages
pp. 438-458
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-26
Open Access
No
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