In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Contributors

Eileen Boris, Hull Professor and Chair, Department of Feminist Studies and Professor of History and Black Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, most recently has written with Jennifer Klein, Caring for America: Home Health Workers in the Shadow of the Welfare State (Oxford University Press, 2012). She is working on a history of global labor standards, tentatively titled Another Century of Struggle: The International Labor Organization and the Making of the Woman Worker.
boris@femst.ucsb.edu

Marisa Chappell is Assistant Professor of History at Oregon State University and the author of The War on Welfare: Family, Poverty, and Politics in Modern America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010).
marisa.chappell@oregonstate.edu

Jennifer Mittelstadt is Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University. She is the author of From Welfare to Workfare: The Unintended Consequences of Liberal Reform, 1945-1965 (University of North Carolina Press, 2005) and is currently writing a book on the all-volunteer army, social welfare, and politics in the late twentieth century.
jmittel@rci.rutgers.edu

Kevin J. Mumford is Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Iowa. He is at work on a book about African American gay culture, activism, and identity, 1960s-1980s.
kevin-mumford@uiowa.edu

Premilla Nadasen is Associate Professor of History at Queens College (CUNY). She is author of the prize-winning Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (Routledge, 2005) and is currently writing a book on the history of domestic-worker organizing in the United States.
premilla.nadasen@qc.cuny.edu, premillanadasen@yahoo.com

Claire Bond Potter is Professor of History at the New School. She is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men, and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and is currently at work on Children First: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution, and the Politics of Pornography, 1968-1990.
potterc@newschool.edu

Sarah F. Rose is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her book manuscript, "No Right to Be Idle: The Invention of Disability, 1850-1930," to be published by University of North Carolina Press, explores the meaning of citizenship for disabled people, tracing how policymakers and employers created disability as a policy problem synonymous with public dependency.
srose@uta.edu

Catherine E. Rymph is Associate Professor of History at the University of Missouri. She is the author of Republican Women: Feminism and Conservatism from Suffrage Through the Rise of the New Right (2006). She is currently at work on a history of foster care from 1935 to 1980.
rymphc@Missouri.edu [End Page 155]

...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1528-4190
Print ISSN
0898-0306
Pages
p. 155
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-18
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.