Abstract

In Latin, ways of speaking about the mind are largely metaphorical. Moreover, while the metaphors that deliver this vocabulary are drawn from different sources, they reflect a coherent “folk model” of the mind that motivates and structures certain dimensions of Roman society’s thought and behavior. In this paper, I present evidence of Latin speakers’ metaphorical conceptualization of the mental domain and reconstruct the folk model from this evidence. Finally, in a culturally comparative perspective, I explore how Latin speakers’ “preferential conceptualization” of mental activity in terms of spatial motion conditions Roman understandings of the literary tradition and of literary imitation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 109-147
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-02
Open Access
No
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