Abstract

This paper investigates the slippage between poetic and philosophical language in three of Horace's Epistles (1.3, 1.19, 1.20). The connections between these individual poems are representative of Horace's poetic interplay in the Epistles as a whole. Horace's use of animal fables, poetic theory, and shared language highlights his belief that to live correctly is tantamount to writing correctly, and that the Epistles offer a suitable generic form for self-exploration and self-criticism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 57-77
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-02
Open Access
No
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