Abstract

This article investigates the problems of visibility, ambivalence, and difference as they relate to our ways of "seeing" domestic abuse. The focal point of this investigation is the 1993 Brian Gibson film, What's Love Got to Do with It, based on Tina Turner's autobiography. In this essay I "re-view" What's Love in order to consider how the complexities of gender, race, and class construct popular cinematic representations of abusive relationships and how these representations can offer us comfortable positions from which to "see" what we already assume about men as abusers, women as victims, and the racial and class politics of violence.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2151-7371
Print ISSN
2151-7363
Pages
pp. 57-77
Launched on MUSE
2003-09-04
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.