Abstract

This article argues that Aleister Crowley’s desire to understand his own occultism in naturalized and psychologized terms was in tension with his view of himself as the leader and founder of a new religion. Crowley’s attitudes towards spiritualist phenomena are here examined together with his views on yoga and magic, showing how Crowley saw himself as leading a life of continuous and consistent spiritual development. Even as Crowley worked to naturalize and psychologize traditional interpretations of occult practices in a modern framework, absorbing the influence of authors such as William James and Henry Maudsley, nevertheless he did not go all the way to a complete naturalization and psychologization of magic.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1940-5111
Print ISSN
1556-8547
Pages
pp. 123-162
Launched on MUSE
2011-11-05
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.