Abstract

This article continues a call for the development of a critical folklore studies as a mode of activist research to redress human suffering and domination. It examines folk criticism as a vibrant, everyday practice and encourages folklorists to embrace critical perspectives as a continuation of this essential human activity. It draws upon Kenneth Burke, Michael Walzer, Thomas McLaughlin, and Antonio Gramsci to illustrate the intimate relationship between folk and professional criticism. Finally, it offers four forms of critical rhetoric intended to complement traditional folklore scholarship and to pursue social change: formal criticism and critique, performance ethnographies, unmaskings, and genealogies.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-1882
Print ISSN
0021-8715
Pages
pp. 251-271
Launched on MUSE
2011-10-26
Open Access
No
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