Abstract

This article examines the recent resurgence of interest in what we call “fabriculture.” Three dimensions of fabriculture are explored: the gendered spaces of production around new domesticity and the social home; the blurring of old and new media in digital craft culture; and the politics of popular culture that emerge in the mix of folk and commercial culture. Ultimately, we conceptualize craft as power (the ability or capacity to act), as a way of understanding current activist possibilities.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2154-9648
Print ISSN
1045-991X
Pages
pp. 233-260
Launched on MUSE
2011-09-29
Open Access
No
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