Abstract

This qualitative study of 11 Black male students who entered a public historically Black college and university (HBCU) as academically underprepared and persisted to graduation, provides insight into the ways in which family promotes academic success for Black male students at a public HBCU. The study’s findings encourage practitioners at HBCUs to reassess the relationship between family involvement and academic success for Black male students. Further, the findings affirm the justification to revise Tinto’s theory of student departure to account for relationships minority students have with support networks outside the campus milieu.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 577-597
Launched on MUSE
2011-09-24
Open Access
No
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