Abstract

After World War I, the library of the University of North Carolina developed into a research library serving a modern university. The dedication of a new library building in October 1929 celebrated this transformation, but the stock market crash and the Depression that followed inhibited further growth. State support plummeted, and the library struggled to build collections and provide services. This essay examines the factors that prevented the library from experiencing a more devastating decline: support from foundations and individuals, federal aid, staff initiative, and the utility and symbolic value of the new library building.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 295-320
Launched on MUSE
2011-08-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.