Abstract

Oklahoma in the 1930s dealt with severe depression and drought, both of which affected the development of the state's public libraries. While the libraries experienced growth at the beginning of the century, helped along by the contributions of women's clubs, the establishment of a state library association and agency, and funding legislation, leaner times appeared in the middle years of the 1930s. Oklahoma's libraries began to rejuvenate by the end of the decade, with an increase in services and facilities, and avoided being "gone with the wind" of the Great Depression.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2166-3033
Print ISSN
2164-8034
Pages
pp. 276-294
Launched on MUSE
2011-08-20
Open Access
No
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