Abstract

This article investigates the effectiveness of Lebanon's post-conflict strategies by exploring the "reconciliation" efforts that were undertaken after the war, and highlights the obstacles to such efforts. While Lebanon signed a peace agreement in October 1989 to officially end a 15-year civil war, today it is still a troubled country. Many have attributed Lebanon's inability to shed its conflict-prone past to its sectarian system; however, this article traces the ongoing instability, in part, to the failure of the government to deal effectively with the abuses of the civil war.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1940-3461
Print ISSN
0026-3141
Pages
pp. 381-397
Launched on MUSE
2011-08-10
Open Access
No
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