Abstract

The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 455-474
Launched on MUSE
2011-07-24
Open Access
No
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