Abstract

When Kant read Newton (and Clarke) the following conceptual space could have been opened up for him: space is neither a substance nor an accident, but is the way in which objects are present to the (divine) mind. Space is the divine sensorium, the means by which God is present to the creation. That objects have a spatial form occurs insofar as objects are dependent upon and known by (divine) mind. Such a conceptual space, transposed (with some modifications) to the human cognitive mind, might plausibly—both philosophically and historically speaking—have helped Kant along the road to transcendental idealism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3222
Print ISSN
0022-5037
Pages
pp. 413-436
Launched on MUSE
2011-07-16
Open Access
No
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