Abstract

Analyzes narrative counterfactuals in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," examining these unrealized scenarios in three distinct storytelling modes: the dialogue and focalization representing the narrative present set in Africa, the italicized vignettes representing the main character's thoughts, and the two endings representing a false rescue and the protagonist's death. Argues that counterfactuality unites the disparate elements of the story and that Hemingway employs this theme to dramatize the productive tension between possibility and foreclosure in the creation of narrative. Focuses on readers' interpretation and judgment of counterfactuals and regret in the story.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 21-35
Launched on MUSE
2011-06-19
Open Access
No
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