Abstract

This essay is a comparative analysis of Esfir Shub's late 1920s compilation documentaries and Santiago Álvarez's early 1970s chronicle films. Despite their apparent formal differences, Shub's and Álvarez's works can be seen as responding to a comparable set of sociopolitical and cultural conditions that manifest themselves in similar methodological and aesthetic choices. Recent work by historians of science provides a framework for understanding Shub's and Álvarez's shift toward a more "restrained" cinema as one that continues to embrace visions of social and political transformation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 26-44
Launched on MUSE
2011-06-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.