Abstract

Demosthenes' characterization of Philip II of Macedon as a charismatic leader and talented opportunist has framed the historical narrative of the fourth century BCE in terms of what Philip did right and the Greek poleis did wrong. An analysis of Philip's early campaigns, drawing on sociological approaches to the study of opportunity, suggests that his "charismatic imagination" was his open-ended, high-risk, and relentless pursuit of new opportunities for growth. Examination of the opportunities open to the Athenians and the Macedonians helps reframe the debate in terms of the overarching constraints affecting the strategic decisions of both states.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2160-5157
Print ISSN
1040-3612
Pages
pp. 1-33
Launched on MUSE
2011-05-27
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2021
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