Abstract

A university-wide suicide prevention program was implemented to provide students, faculty, and staff tools to identify, assist, and refer distressed and suicidal individuals. The study examined participant self-reports of suicide-related knowledge and prevention skills, group differences in suicide prevention knowledge and skills, group differences in confidence and comfort levels, and changes in participants’ beliefs that the interventions they conducted were effective. Participants completed a questionnaire at three time points. Results showed significant increases in self-rated knowledge about suicide, suicide prevention, awareness of resources and belief in the appropriateness and likelihood they would ask someone about suicide. Implications for campus suicide prevention and education programs are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 350-361
Launched on MUSE
2011-05-20
Open Access
No
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