Abstract

Julius Caesar initially seems a curious choice for the first two full translations of Shakespeare into Japanese. In seeking to understand the early popularity of the play, this article examines the translations by Kawashima Keizō and Tsubouchi Shōyō within the context of performative modes of political discourse in 1880s Japan. This article argues that Shōyō's translation demonstrates a naturalizing translation strategy and a progressive political agenda, while Kawashima's translation strategy is foreignizing and is allied with the establishment. It further argues that their diametrically opposed interpretations are both inscribed in the source text and manifest themselves in ways that address political and historical conditions specific to the early Meiji period (1868-1912).

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2109
Print ISSN
0742-5457
Pages
pp. 168-183
Launched on MUSE
2011-05-28
Open Access
No
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