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28 Historically Speaking · June 2002 Enlightenments toasingleformulawhichomits whatcannotbe madetofit. Eliminatedis what does not interest the 18th-century historian or the 21st-centuryprofessor ofthe history of politicalthought. It will not do to say that Professor Pocock is notalluding toa whole when he writespassagessuch as: The strategy ofEnlightenment in Scotlandwas the development ofa science ofmorality, which on the assumption that humans were intrinsically social beings becameascience ofsociety in allits ramifications . It... took theform ofjurisprudence, which was then organized into history and next—the most importantly but less immediately sofor thepurposes ofthepresent volume—intopoliticaleconomy .... The Enlightened, however, seizedthe high ground; they exhibited morality, sociability andas we shall see history, as systems intelligible in themselves, and withoutbotheringtodenytheefficacyofgrace, leftit to attach itselfas best it couldtophenomena that could be understoodwithout it (11:313). When Professor Pocock cites modern historians ofScotland , he tends to cite those whose work issimilarly narrow in conceiving enlightenment and the Scottish Enlightenment— partly because it is often somewhat derivativefrom his own. He and they have unduly narrowed the Scottish Enlightenment by excludingfrom theprocesses they talk about things which were central to it andcentral to enlightenment and Enlightenments throughout much ofEurope. Allthisdoes bearon historiography both in Scotlandand elsewhere. The conjecturalhistories sometimes occurredwithin a naturalhistory ofman— those were Baconiancollections of facts about men on which inductions rested. The contextfor such a view was a scientific one. The anthropology used to describe human nature was not without similar relations to thescience oftheperiod, as manydiscussions ofraceanddevelopmentshow . Themethods ofthe moralsciences—as they were conceived by George Turnbull, David Hume, Adam Smith, Adam Ferguson, andothers with whom Pocock hasdealt—were oftenexplicitly relatedtothemethodsorways ofthinkingofthe scientists. Andthefact that the men with whom hedeals were oftenput inplace by others withparticularpatronageaims is not irrelevant to the careers ofSmith, William Robertson, or Ferguson. Nor is it irrelevant to thefact that they wrote the kinds ofhistories they did. Gibbon was not, like Robertson, urgedby LardButetowritehistories ofacertainsort; nor, like Ferguson, didhe write one which was to beapplaudedby his friends whofavoredaScottish militia.John Pocock's Enlightenments when tbey omit such things are too narrow. When he as an historian ignores them, he is not helping us better to understandGibbon orthetraditionsfrom which hedrewand among which he worked Roger L Emerson University ofWestern Ontario 2003 Prizes The Best Book in African History Prize A prize of$5,000 will be awarded for the best book by a member ofthe Society on any subject relating to African history published in the last three years. To be considered, the book must have been published between January I1 2000 and December 31, 2002. Candidates should submit six copies ofthe book to: John Higginson, Chair Best Book in African History Prize Committee The Historical Society 656 Beacon Street, Mezzanine Boston, MA 02215-2010 The Best Book in Latin American History Prize A prize of $5,000 will be awarded for the best book by a member ofthe Society on any subject relating to Latin American history published in the last three years. To be considered, the book must have been published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2002. Candidates should submit six copies ofthe book to: John Womack, Jr., Chair Best Book in Latin American History Prize Committee The Historical Society 656 Beacon Street, Mezzanine Boston, MA 02215-2010 The Arnaldo Momigliano Best Article in History Prize A prize of $2,000 named after Arnaldo Momigliano will be awarded for the best article by a member ofthe Society on any historical subject. To be considered, the article must have been published in a refereedjournal between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2002. Candidates should submit six copies ofthe article to: Franklin W. Knight, Chair Arnaldo Momigliano Prize Committee 656 Beacon Street, Mezzanine Boston, MA 02215-2010 DEADLINE: All submissions must be postmarked by January 31, 2003. ...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1944-6438
Print ISSN
1941-4188
Pages
p. 28
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-04
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Ceased Publication
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