Abstract

Attentive to the disjunctures of the Chinese diaspora in the Americas, Patricia Powell's The Pagoda intertextually reterritorializes the tropes of Asian American literature and cultural criticism in a Jamaican context in order to fashion what I call a queer utopian historical romance. The novel portrays a simultaneously pluralist and creolizing anticolonial nationalism emerging from queer intimacies that cut across the racial divisions of late nineteenth-century Jamaica. Not only does this displace the masculinist labor movements of the 1930s as the originary moment of anticolonial Jamaican nationalism, but The Pagoda also offers a Caribbean alternative to US-based models of ethnic literature, limning distinctive histories of racialization, creolization, and pluralism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-6714
Print ISSN
0799-0537
Pages
pp. 95-109
Launched on MUSE
2011-04-14
Open Access
No
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