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About the Contributors Dori· Betts has been teaching at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill since 1 966 and is the author of nine books of fiction, most recendy Souls Raisedfrom the Deadand The Sharp Teeth ofLove. Qavin James Campbell is music editor for Southern Cultures. He received his Ph.D. in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The topic of his dissertation was "Music and the Making of aJim Crow Culture, 1900—1925." James C. Cobb is B. Phinizy Spalding Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Georgia. His essay is adapted from his recent book, Redefining Southern Culture: Mind andIdentity in the Modern South, which was published in August 1999 by the University of Georgia Press. Sarah E. Gardner is an assistant professor ofhistory at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. Her current project is a study ofwhite southern women's narratives of the Civil War, 1 86 1—1 937. John Shelton Reed is William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology and the director of the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University ofNorth Carolina at Chapel Hill. Among his recent books is 1001 Things Everyone Should KnowAbout the South, written with his wife, Dale Volberg Reed. He is coeditor of Southern Cultures. John Michael Vlach is professor ofAmerican studies and anthropology at George Washington University. His most recent book is Back ofthe Big House: the Architecture ofPlantation Slavery, published by the University ofNorth Carolina Press in 1993. Harry L. Watson is professor ofhistory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His most recent publication is Liberty and Power: The Politics offacksonian America. He is also coeditor of Southern Cultures. 100 ...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1488
Print ISSN
1068-8218
Pages
p. 100
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-04
Open Access
No
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