Abstract

This essay explores the relationship between representation and event in the work of German artists Anselm Kiefer and Joseph Beuys. It focuses on the ways in which Kiefer and Beuys engage with an evolving constellation of problems, discourses, and representational strategies that developed in West German culture and abroad in response to the events of genocide. The paradoxes of Holocaust representation, it is argued, reveal themselves in the conflict between the moral imperative to remember and the impossibility of representing a past that by its singularity, incomprehensibility, and horror evades clear representation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6636
Print ISSN
0893-5378
Pages
pp. 113-146
Launched on MUSE
2003-04-18
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Ceased Publication
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