Abstract

Frank O’Hara (1926–1966) is emphatically identified with New York, and yet like other poets of the “New York School,” he had considerable creative investments in the foreign. A particular and recurrent strand of this interest is his identification with the “pejorative” or “degenerate” connotations of French art and literature. In response to a national-paternal homophobia at home, O’Hara used the idea of France to explore and to re-signify his lowly status, and to move toward an alternative poetic. This thematic also indicates a general model for O’Hara’s practice of poetry: the poem functions as a linguistic elsewhere, a holding-place for “where we would like to be” and “that which we would like to exist.”

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 125-142
Launched on MUSE
2011-01-13
Open Access
No
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