Abstract

Vagueness is a quality not typically imputed to Ernest Hemingway's writing, early or late. Nor is unintended ambiguity—the kind resulting from two differing meanings of a phrase, not from multiple interpretations of its thematic import. It is surprising, therefore, to come upon two passages in one of his best early stories, "Soldier's Home," that seem in their apparent vagueness and ambiguity to defy these well-deserved accolades. On closer observation, however, these passages reveal techniques, influences, and aesthetic values that helped shape Hemingway's early style.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 158-164
Launched on MUSE
2010-11-24
Open Access
No
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