Abstract

Ivan Turgenev's influence on Ernest Hemingway has been widely appreciated, yet important aspects of this link remain unmined. One of Turgenev's most poignant works, his 1870 essay "The Execution of Tropmann," introduces a theme that Hemingway would spend an entire career negotiating: the artist's responsibility to witness violence in all its horror, to observe the most minute details that may challenge one's own humanity, and finally, to render that scene with accuracy, using authenticity to inspire emotion. This article examines the thematics of Turgenev's essay, and then explores Hemingway's own entrance into similar literary terrain.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 31-50
Launched on MUSE
2010-11-24
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.