Abstract

This essay explores the significance of the opening paragraph of Hemingway's "God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen," examining the perplexing but necessary comparison of two seemingly unrelated locales, Kansas City and Constantinople. Early drafts of the story include substantively different introductions. In the published story, however, Hemingway's reliance on a barren physical topography establishes the emotional climate, uniting two distant cities to suggest that the impoverishment of modern urban life is the root cause of the story's tragedy.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 18-30
Launched on MUSE
2010-11-24
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.