Abstract

The language surrounding adaptations from print texts to film reflects a valuing of print for its originary authority. Despite this privileging of print textuality, several recent fairytale films blend fairy-tale motifs and references to popular film and culture in something more akin to a "hypertextual" aesthetic. This article suggests that Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth [El laberinto del fauno] (2006) integrates motifs from multiple sources in a way that benefits from elements of both print textuality and hypertextuality, a combination that mediates fairy-tale content to ward explicitly sociopolitical critique.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 235-254
Launched on MUSE
2010-11-12
Open Access
No
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