Abstract

This article argues that the film Pan's Labyrinth articulates forms of resistance coded as disobedience to totalitarian/monologic storytelling as embodied in the character of the fascist Captain Vidal. The narrative disobediences enacted by the young protagonist, Ofelia, in particular work to resist not only political domination of citizens but also the family and women. Further, the narrative disobedience of the film itself also troubles generic boundaries and monologic discourse by multiplying versions and storytelling situations, thus suggesting storytelling itself as a vital and important vehicle for resistance to oppression and as a mechanism of social change.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 219-234
Launched on MUSE
2010-11-12
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.