Abstract

Most commonly associated with the striking engravings by William Blake which embellished its 1796 publication, John Gabriel Stedman's Narrative has much to offer scholars of colonial history and literature beyond this connection. This paper reads Stedman's account of military life in the troubled Dutch colony of Suriname in terms of his fascination with the effects of the turbulent colonial environment on skin. As the point of convergence for social narratives of the body in terms of beauty, feeling, health, and race, skin becomes the motif through which Stedman makes sense of the disease and death which surround him.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 39-56
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-24
Open Access
No
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