Abstract

Karl Polanyi, historian of the market, describes "belief in the gold standard" during the twenties as "the faith of the age," adding that for believers, "bank notes have value because they represented gold." Departing from tensions within the idea of money (as anatomized by Karl Marx, Slavoj Žižek, and Suzanne de Brunhoff), this essay explores the logic of F. Scott Fitzgerald's choice (in 1922) of the Diamond (bigger than the Ritz) as an analogue for the function of monetary gold within the American postwar economy at a point when, for the sociologists Robert and Helen Lynd, "more and more of the activities of living are coming to be strained through the bars of the dollar sign."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 589-613
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-24
Open Access
No
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