Abstract

In this essay, I draw on ethnographic interviews with Israeli and Palestinian queer activists in Israel to interrogate the centrality of the politics of visibility in "mainstream" queer activism. I suggest that queer Israeli activists' reliance on visibility as a political strategy is embedded in and supportive of the racist discourses of Israeli nationalism and the violent practices of the Israeli state. I argue that the "checkpoint," rather than the "closet," offers a more productive metaphor against which queer activists and thinkers might organize their efforts. I conclude with a discussion of the subversive potential of queer Palestinian activism as a politics that challenges multiple oppressions and undermines, rather than naturalizes, the racist, antidemocratic logic of the nation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-9375
Print ISSN
1064-2684
Pages
pp. 557-576
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-20
Open Access
No
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