Abstract

Since the Korean War, the United States has maintained a one-sided approach toward the Korean peninsula—pro-Seoul and anti-Pyongyang. Its policy toward the North has been one of military containment, diplomatic isolation, and economic sanctions. In the 1990s, though, with the changing political climate in South Korea and the Communist bloc, together with the fruition of the South's policy of rapprochement with Eastern Europe, Russia, and China, the United States will probably have to reassess that policy. While retaining its security commitment to South Korea, the U.S. may find it advisable in the long term to adopt a gradual process of multilateral diplomatic and economic accommodation toward the North.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1529
Print ISSN
0145-840X
Pages
pp. 13-28
Launched on MUSE
2011-03-30
Open Access
No
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