Abstract

From 1993 through 1997 undergraduate women participated in a research project that assessed the cognitive value of college women's female friendships. To capture how the cognitive value of college female friendship had changed since graduation, a qualitative longitudinal cohort study was designed to capture the phenomenon through time. The women who participated perceived the cognitive value of these relationships in ways that are consistent with feminist developmental theories and research, as well as other constructivist suppositions about life-span development. In evaluating the longitudinal data, it was apparent that across all three longitudinal constructs—constancy, change and transition—women understood their college female friendships as developmentally necessary and potent relationships whose cognitive effects carry over into their postcollegiate lives.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4640
Print ISSN
0022-1546
Pages
pp. 553-582
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-06
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
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