Abstract

Sixteen years since the end of the liberation struggle South Africa's cities have become crucial spaces of self-determination and lively community democracy. Yet their form has changed very little instead highlighting the persistence of poverty (and racism) within neoliberal, post-apartheid capitalism that the transition promised to end. This article explores the enduring quality of deep economic and social marginalization, specifically in the context of Cape Town's informal settlements, which reflect both collective desires for "rights to the city" and their denial.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 551-580
Launched on MUSE
2010-09-17
Open Access
No
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