Abstract

By challenging the limits of the natural, predictable, and reasonable, the Gothic offered a certain amount of freedom from the referentiality of realist texts, creating an unconventional vision of reality through conventional narrative. This article explores the productive tensions between Gothic elements and realist narrative forms, which were predominantly influenced by developmental novels in the sentimental, moralistic, and didactic traditions. Bürger's use of the Gothic not only allowed for the creation of unconventional female protagonists; it reacted against the obsessive focus on the domestic sphere and its value system and expressed formal displeasure with the increasing staleness of the possibilities of realistic writing conventions at the end of the century. (KAW)

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 11-27
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.