Abstract

Germany in the 1970s was subject to a wave of terrorist activities in which women such as Ulrike Meinhof and Gudrun Ensslin played a significant role. The mass media and public discourse in general struggled with women's participation in these cases of extreme physical violence. In this article, I explore the articulations of the discourses of gender, nation, and violence in the German news magazine Der Spiegel, Ulrike Meinhof's television play Bambule, and Traude Bührmann's Flüge über Moabiter Mauern (Flights over Moabit's Walls), in order to illuminate representations of female insurgency. My argument centers around their different uses of deviance and the changing character of social criticism in the 1970s and 1980s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 207-220
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
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