Abstract

Frank Wedekind's Lulu, of his plays Earth-Spirit (1895) and Pandora's Box (1904), and Arthur Schnitzler's Else, from the novella Fräulein Else (1924), are both examples of female performance artists given their construction of stylized and aestheticized selves. By comparing Lulu and Else, this essay reveals how women's performativity can either constitute a form of empowerment and self-affirmation or serve as a path toward commodification and consumability. Despite Lulu's and Else's initial attempts to achieve agency by fashioning themselves as artists or aesthetes, socioeconomic forces and the men who control them turn both women into aesthetic objects and salable commodities. (KC)

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 189-210
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
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