Abstract

This essay argues that Unger's Bekenntnisse einer schönen Seele creates a textual frame for Raphael's "Transfiguration" that shifts the focus of the painting away from its dominant male figures and religious themes and realigns it with the problem of a woman's development within restrictive patriarchal social structures. Using Goethe's Bekenntnisse einer schönen Seele as the implied first point of reference, Unger's novel interrogates the literary construction of ideal femininity as represented in Goethe's "beautiful soul" characters. Raphael's Transfiguration functions as the second point of reference and serves to challenge Goethe's representations, and reinterpret their meaning. Ultimately, Raphael's painting assumes the unlikely role of depicting Unger's alternative feminine ideal. (CPB)

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 103-133
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
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