Abstract

Focusing on Otto Dix's 1922 painting To Beauty, this article explores how Dix, a German working-class artist, promoted himself in the work as an Americanized, bourgeois, jazz-loving dancer. In so doing, Dix utilized the painting's composition, symbolism, and cultural context to argue for a masculine, multiracial dominance in the female-associated world of dance. By fundamentally questioning gendered divisions within Weimar dance culture, Dix's example demonstrates how men were seminal participants in dance's vitality. This examination reconceptualizes historical gender alignments in cultural spheres, and thus envisions new modes of cultural participation in which masculinity, like femininity, changes over time.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 163-191
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
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