Abstract

Read together, Kenelm Digby's Observations upon "Religio Medici" and Sir Thomas Browne's responses to Digby in private correspondence and in his address "To the Reader" in the 1643 edition of Religio show how Browne's masterpiece becomes a public text that illuminates the dynamics of early modern critical reception and authorial defense and complicates the idealized performance of subjectivity in Religio itself. In the exchange between Browne and Digby, Religio is transformed into a collective enterprise produced by the activity of printers and readers as well as the author: a collaboration larger than the author can control and defined by a public reading that overrides authorial desires.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 117-136
Launched on MUSE
2003-02-25
Open Access
No
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